Cleaning business website design basics

cleaning business website design

Design basics for a cleaning business website will be obvious to a trained systems designer, but not to a website-design novice. For this reason, it is always best to hire an experienced web designer to create the business website. The expert will strategically build the site so that it will function well and catch the attention of the target audience.


Think of it this way. An audience watching a performance onstage is unaware of the team of people and structures behind the scenes. If these unseen people and elements do their job correctly, the audience experiences a smooth performance.


A functioning website works in a similar way. It contains many aspects that are not apparent from the perspective of the online visitor. There are specific code and design-theory considerations that are unlikely to be handled correctly by someone without the right skills. The result you should aim for is an effective, aesthetically pleasing cleaning business website which plays a central role in your ongoing marketing strategy.


Load times

One critical aspect regarding your business website which most non-website designers overlook, is load time. A load time longer than a split second is untenable. Impatience is rampant in online searchers. Nobody wants to sit waiting for a website to load.


Research shows the majority of people will leave if the site takes longer than three seconds to load. More recent research cuts that time down to two seconds! So, the length of time that people will wait is decreasing over time, which means your website code must be clean and validated.


Don't know what “validated” means? Trained web designers do. Validated refers to functionality. Your code must constantly update to standards that are continually evolving, to make the Internet function better and faster.


Navigation

Navigation must be clean, simple and clear. The visitor must know where to go, why, and get there easily. Keep the navigation buttons or icons simple and place them all on the left side, or in one row across the top. Do not include filler on your website, it distracts. Only include what is necessary to get the call to action you want.


Your message

Your website's message should be 80% about your visitor and 20% about your services and offerings. Focus on the customer, and list or describe the benefits they receive when they hire you. Acknowledge their concerns and mention the reasons they are now considering hiring you. This takes a bit of practice because you have to train yourself to be objective and see your service from the customer's point of view.


Too many cleaning business websites focus entirely on their cleaning service and boast about how fabulous they are. They do not take the perspective of the first-time visitor, who wants to know, “what's in it for me?”


Of course, it is important to use phrases on your site that project healthy confidence in your business and in your abilities, but just be aware of sounding self-congratulatory. Show it, don't just tell about it. People scan for signs of malarkey as they surf through a site that is new to them. When they come across a business that seems to toot its own horn a bit too loudly, they are likely to be turned off. It's common for us consumers to judge whether a service or product is good or not. But we want to judge for ourselves, not simply be told how wonderful something is. You will find it helpful to post testimonials from real customers as your business grows.


You only need a paragraph on the "about us” page to talk about how wonderful your company is. The rest of the website should be about how your customer will benefit from hiring your service.



Call to action

Your only goal should be to get a phone call or email, preferably a phone call. Once you are communicating with potential customers, get right to business. Show that you respect their time, and tell them you are happy they took the time to contact you. Do not waste their time with irrelevant chit-chat. Schedule a consultation or job with as few in-between actions or conversations as possible.



Keep it evolving

Nothing says “out of business” or “behind the times” like an outdated website. Aim to upgrade the look and feel of your website every few years. As with clothing design and fashion, visitors will instantly recognize old website design and make an instantaneous or unconscious judgment about it. This up-to-date element may not seem of any importance to a janitorial company, and as far as the work you do in the real world, it is not. However, in online marketing the goal is to maintain an updated company persona. Your website acts as a convenience for you and for your customers, a go-between. You want it to appear as if the lights are on, you are open for business, and standing ready to be in touch with the visitors on your site.


Your cleaning business website is your digital calling-card, your cyber persona. Sounds real sci-fi, right? True, in a way it is, but too many cleaning services do not take their business websites seriously, and as a result miss out on a lot of business. Why not make your website work for you?

Cleaning business website design articles:

Cleaning business website design

Cleaning service business website

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